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  • 08 Mar 2017 9:32 AM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)
    Dear VAN Readers-

    Welcome to this special edition of VAN dedicated to VAF members favorite summer activity—field school!  Included is information about 11 field schools in locations from Wisconsin to Pennsylvania to Idaho where students can be engaged in archaeology, building investigation, and cultural landscape studies.   Also included is the call for applications to the Orlando Ridout V Fieldwork Fellowship award for 2017 where there are five categories of support ranging from funds for field school directors to assist attendees with costs to support for VAF members in continuing to develop skills in documentation and field work.

    There are so many wonderful opportunities, please don’t keep this newsletter to yourself!  Read it and forward it to anyone you know who might be considering field school this year. 

    Best

    Christine

    VAN editor

  • 07 Mar 2017 6:32 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    2017 Orlando Ridout V Fieldwork Fellowship Award 

    To honor founding member Orlando Ridout V, who died in 2013, the Vernacular Architecture Forum has established a fieldwork fellowship in his name. Orlando, a mentor to so many of us, asked that donations in his memory be made to the VAF to support students in fieldwork. To fulfill his request, the Orlando Ridout V Fieldwork Fellowship was created, combining contributions to the Ridout memorial fund with the former Fund for Fieldwork, established by a generous gift from long-time VAF member Thomas Carter in 2012.

    The Orlando Ridout V Fieldwork Fellowship will support and encourage students and VAF members in their field-based research and documentation projects, and in their efforts to learn and conduct fieldwork through apprenticeships, field schools, and continuing education and training projects.

    The guidelines for the Orlando Ridout V Fieldwork Fellowship allow all VAF members, as well as students participating in field school programs, to apply to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee for monies to support their field-based projects and training opportunities.

    Support is available in five categories:

    1.  Field school directors (VAF members) may apply for grants of up to $1000 to support their programs and/or provide financial aid to participants;
    2. Students participating in field schools or other training opportunities may apply for stipends of up to $500 to attend such programs (prior VAF membership not required);
    3. VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 to support continuing education and professional training activities.
    4. VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 for support of fieldwork activities related to the pursuit of academic degrees;
    5. VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 to support fieldwork activities not related to fulfillment of academic degree requirements;

    Projects that explore and document cultural diversity are especially welcome.

    Grants to Field School Directors  

    Grants of up to $1000 are available to field schools organized and directed by VAF members.  These awards may be applied to program costs and/or stipends to participants at the discretion of the field school director.

    Application Process  APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MARCH 20, 2017

    Completed applications by field school directors should be submitted electronically to the Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee between January1 and March 20, 2017; a decision will be rendered by April 1, 2017.  The application should define the scope, methodology, objectives, and expected outcomes of the field school. A final report will be submitted to the Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the field school describing the outcomes and impacts of the field school; if the funds were used to provide scholarships to individual participants, a list of the students who received the scholarships and amounts awarded should be included.  In addition, individual field school participants who received scholarship awards from the Field School Director should submit a brief report (up to three written pages, images, video, etc.) directly to the Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the field school discussing how the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship enabled them to obtain an understanding of fieldwork and how it will contribute to their future work/career. 

    Grants to students participating in field schools or other training opportunities

    Grants of up to $500 are available to students currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate programs who will be participating in field schools or other training opportunities.  Prior membership in the VAF is not required. 

    Application Process

    Applications should be submitted electronically to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee by the student applying to or accepted to a field school during 2017 at least one month prior to the start of the field school.  The cut-off date for receiving applications is October 1, 2017.  The application must include a description of the field school/training program to which the applicant has applied (name and location of the program, director, dates); a description of what expenses the grant will cover; the applicant’s CV; a letter of recommendation from a faculty member, field school director, or employer; copy of the letter/email of admission to the field school; and a brief essay on what the applicant hopes to learn, why the particular training is important, and how it might influence the applicant’s later academic and professional career.  If the applicant applies to the VAF for support to attend a field school prior to receiving notification of admission, such notification must be submitted before the grant can be awarded.

    The grantee will provide a brief report (up to three written pages, photo essay, video, or other presentation) to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the field school about the field school experience and how it has benefitted the grantee and increased his/her understanding of the importance of fieldwork as a research activity.

    Grants to VAF members to support continuing education and professional training activities.

    VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 to support continuing education and professional training related to fieldwork.

    Application Process

    Applications should be submitted electronically to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee by the applicant at least one month prior to the start of the program.  Applications will be accepted between January 1 and October 1, 2017.  The application must include a description of the program to which the applicant has applied (name and location of the program, director, dates); a description of what expenses the grant will cover; the applicant’s CV; copy of the letter/email of admission to the program; and a brief essay on what the applicant hopes to learn, why the particular training is important, and how it might influence and/or further the applicant’s career.  If the applicant applies to the VAF for support to attend an educational/training program prior to receiving notification of admission, such notification must be submitted before the grant can be awarded. 

    The grantee will provide a brief report (up to three written pages, photo essay, video, or other presentation) to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the educational/training program and how it has benefitted the grantee and increased his/her understanding of the importance of fieldwork as a research activity or ability to conduct such work.

    Grants to VAF members for support of fieldwork activities related to the pursuit of academic degrees

    VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 for support of fieldwork activities that are related to the achievement of an academic degree.

    Application Process

    Applications should be submitted electronically to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee by the applicant between January 1 and October 1, 2017, and at least one month prior to the start of the project.  The application must include a description of the fieldwork project to be undertaken (nature of the resource(s) to be studied, methodology, expected outcomes and impact, project timeline); a description of expenses the grant will cover; the applicant’s CV; and a letter of support from a faculty member or academic advisor.

    The grantee will provide a brief report (up to three written pages, photo essay, video, or other presentation) to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the project.

    Grants to VAF members for support of fieldwork not related to pursuit of an academic degree

    VAF members may apply for grants of up to $500 for support of non-academic research projects involving fieldwork related to a publication, exhibition, etc., or for preservation-related fieldwork such as documentation of threatened resources.  

    Application Process

    Applications should be submitted electronically to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee by the applicant between January 1 and October 1, 2017.  The application must include a brief essay describing the resource(s) to be studied, the reasons for undertaking the fieldwork, methodology to be employed, expected outcomes and impacts; the applicant’s CV; if partnering with an organization, please describe the organization and include a letter from the organization describing their involvement and any contributions they might make (financial or otherwise); at least one letter of support for the project.

    The grantee will provide a brief report (up to three written pages, photo essay, video, or other presentation) to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee within three months of the completion of the project describing the outcomes and impacts of the project on the resource, community, and/or their own understanding of and ability to conduct fieldwork.

    Reports submitted by grantees to the VAF Ridout Fieldwork Fellowship Committee maybe submitted at the discretion of the Committee Members for posting on the VAF web page, blog, or newsletter (VAN).

    For more information, please see the VAF website.

  • 06 Mar 2017 9:26 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    For more information, contact Dr. Lauren K. McMillan lmcmi6lq@umw.edu



  • 06 Mar 2017 9:09 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    Application Deadline: April 8, 2017

    For more information: http://design.uky.edu/blog/newsevent/the-kentucky-field-school/

    The University of Kentucky College of Design, Department of Historic Preservation is proud to offer the country’s first hybrid field school – HP 676 Field Methods in Heritage Conservation. The course is designed to provide participants the opportunity to experience the critical study of the built environment firsthand, while providing flexibility for those with busy academic, work and family obligations.

    The course will emphasize emerging technologies for heritage documentation and interpretation, innovative ways to integrate local knowledge into the documentation process, and historic preservation as a tool for social, environmental, and economic justice.

    The field school’s renowned interdisciplinary team of instructors will guide participants through hands-on experience documenting and interpreting a select neighborhood paying close attention to its geographical, architectural, social-cultural, economic, and historical context.

    Course Structure

    HP 676 will be taught in three units:

    Unit One (May 22-June 2, 2017): Unit One will be taught entirely online and will include readings, content videos, and assignments designed to prepare students for the second-unit, a nine-day field school taught in Lexington, Ky., June 3-10, 2017.

    Unit Two (Field School June 3-10, 2017): During the field school students will work 8-10 hours a day alongside a member of our highly acclaimed interdisciplinary team of visiting instructors, documenting and interpreting the built environment and intangible culture of a select neighborhood. The field school will offer participants hands-on experience employing traditional documentation techniques, as well as emerging technologies, including: 3D laser scanning and modeling, spatial mapping, ground penetrating radar, and digital storytelling.

    Unit Three (June 12-June 30, 2017): Following the field school, students will return home where they will collaborate online with their classmates to complete a digital documentation report utilizing the data collected during the field school.

    Field School Instructors

    • David L. Ames, Ph.D.
      Professor Emeritus of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, University of Delaware

    • Josh Ayoroa, March, LEED AP Ayoroa | Simmons, PLLC
      Ayora | Simmons

    • Ned Crankshaw, Ph.D.
      Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Kentucky
      Ned Crankshaw

    • Karen Hudson, Ph.D.
      Department of Historic Preservation, University of Kentucky
      Karen Hudson Bio

    • Ned Kaufman, Ph.D.
      Kaufman Heritage Conservation
      Ned Kaufman Bio

    • Kim McBride, Ph.D.
      Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey, University of Kentucky
      Kentucky Archaeological Survey

    • Rich Schein, Ph.D.
      Department of Geography, University of Kentucky
      Rich Schein Bio

    • Matthew W. Wilson, Ph.D.
      Associate Professor of Geography, University of Kentucky
      Visiting Scholar, Harvard University
      Mapshop Director
      New Mappings Collaboratory

    Participants

    Like our instructors, we encourage participation from students from diverse educational, professional, and geographical backgrounds.

    Whether you are a graduate student interested in pursuing a career in heritage conservation; an activist interested in learning more about the field methods and techniques used by a wide range of disciplines to critically study the built environment; or a seasoned heritage professional looking for continuing education opportunities, HP 676 Field Methods in Heritage Conservation was designed with you in mind.

    Academic Credit

    HP 676 Field Methods in Heritage Conservation carries three hours of graduate academic credit. Students from other institutions are responsible for coordinating the acceptance and/or transfer of graduate credits.

    How to Enroll

    Students wishing to enroll in HP 676 must first apply to the University of Kentucky Graduate School. It is a fairly simple process that will take 5-10 minutes to complete. The prerequisite and application materials required will depend on the admission category under which a student wishes to apply, for example: regular admission, post-baccalaureate graduate students, graduating seniors as part-time graduate students, visiting students, and life-long learners.

    To apply, follow the Registrar’s instructions, available here. If you need additional help determining admission criteria, please contact Azhar Swanson, Director of Students Services, College of Design at Azhar Swanson.

    Once the application is submitted, it will be reviewed by the Director of the Department of Historic Preservation, who will notify the graduate school of their admission decision. The student will then be provided instructions for how to enroll in HP 676-201, 1st summer session.

    Deadline

    The deadline for applying for admission to the Graduate School for the 2017 1st summer session is April 8, 2017. Due to the immersive nature of the field school, enrollment in HP 676 will be limited to 20 participants. We encourage you to apply early.

    Tuition

    Since HP 676 is being taught as part of the Department of Historic Preservation’s Online Graduate Certificate program, all students regardless of residency status will pay in-state tuition. Current tuition rates are posted here.

    Tuition covers three credit hours of graduate coursework, expert instruction, laboratory materials and supplies, transportation during the field school, some meals, and field trips.

    Participants are responsible for travel to and from Lexington, housing and most meals.

    Housing

    Students are responsible for their own housing during the field school. For information about living on campus, contact Karen Hudson at Karen Hudson.

    Meals

    Students have the option of providing their own meals during the field school, or taking individual meals on campus. A formal meal plan is not required. There are many restaurants within walking distance of the UK campus, but students must bring their lunch with them each day. If they choose a university meal plan, a packed lunch will be provided each day. Contact Karen Hudson for additional information about university meal plans.

    Scholarships

    A limited number of partial tuition scholarships are available to students enrolled in HP 676 and accepted to the Department of Historic Preservation’s Online Graduate Certificate Program. If you wish to be considered for a scholarship, please submit your application by email to Karen Hudson by April 1, 2017. Be sure to include “HP 676 Scholarship Application” in the subject line. Award decisions will be announced by April 7, 2017. Scholarship applications should include:

    1) A brief 250-500 word essay including the following:

    • Your complete name
    • Address
    • Phone #
    • Email address
    • Education degree awarded/institution
    • Major and anticipated date of graduation (if applicable)
    • Current occupation (graduate student, employment, retired/volunteering/unemployed)
    • How did you learn about the Kentucky Field School
    • Brief description of employment responsibilities (if applicable)
    • Your professional goals
    • How you believe you might benefit from the course
    • Your needs for financial assistance, and why you might not be able to attend the field school without financial assistance
    • Identify the person that will be submitting your letter of recommendation and their relationship to you

    2) One letter of recommendation from faculty or professional associate. Letter of recommendation should be emailed directly from the author to karen.hudson@uky.edu. Please tell authors to include “Your Name—HP 676 Scholarship Recommendation” in the subject line.

    Need additional information? Please address additional questions to:

    Karen Hudson, Ph.D.
    Department of Historic Preservation
    University of Kentucky
    112 Pence Hall
    Lexington, KY 40506
    (859) 257-7617
    karen.hudson@uky.edu
    College of Design

  • 06 Mar 2017 8:57 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    Application Deadline: May 1, 2017

    For more information: www.ahp.umd.edu


  • 06 Mar 2017 8:45 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)
    For more information: www.strawberybanke.org/fieldschool.cfm

    Application Deadline: rolling admissions, ends June 2, 2017

    Session 1: June 5-16, 2017

    Session 2: June 19-30, 2017


    Our 21st annual field school focuses on preserving the archaeological resources surrounding the historic Penhallow House in advance of the house’s rehabilitation as part of the Heritage House Program.  The house was built c. 1750, occupied by Samuel Penhallow, a Portsmouth judge. The house was moved to its present location in 1862 and became one of a few houses occupied by African American families along Washington Street in the 20th century.  This course is intended to offer students in the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, or related fields hands-on training in field and lab methodology. Students are trained in proper archaeological field techniques and learn to identify historic artifacts. Museum tours, required readings on Historical Archaeology, and quizzes introduce students to various areas of historic specialization. Students also work in the Carter Collections Center laboratory to gain experience in processing artifacts. Students spend approximately 70% of their time outside in the field, with additional time spent in the Archaeology Lab and classroom. This field school places a special emphasis on public interpretation. Students interact daily with museum visitors and are expected to offer interpretation of the site and the excavation activity.

  • 06 Mar 2017 7:54 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    For more information: Prof. Andrzejewski at avandrzejews@wisc.edu.


    Fieldschool in American Vernacular Architecture

    Farmsteads on the Frontier: German-Russian Immigrants in Western North Dakota

    Anna Andrzejewski, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Instructor)

    June 19 - July 17, 2017


    This fieldschool will focus on documenting historic farmsteads built by German-Russian immigrants in western North Dakota (Hetinger and Stark Counties) during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This four-week course will be split between the Madison campus and the field sites North Dakota; we will spend at least one week in the field and the rest of the time back in Madison working on an “ebook” to disseminate our findings. The course will teach skills in building documentation, archival research, and interviewing. This is a 3 credit course offered through the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Non UW-Madison students may take the course as a “Special Student.” There is cost for tuition, but travel & lodging expenses during the field portion of the class are fully covered.

    For more information, email Prof. Andrzejewski at avandrzejews@wisc.edu.

  • 06 Mar 2017 7:33 PM | Christine R Henry (Administrator)

    For More Information: Thefieldschool.weebly.com and http://nhalliance1.org/storymap/ 


    Picturing Milwaukee: Sherman Park

    Summer 2017 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School

    Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


    SEE COURSE DETAILS AT Thefieldschool.weebly.com

    Class Dates: June 26 - August 5, 2017; Final exhibit: August 18, 2017

    Preparatory Workshop (attendance required), June 23. 2014, 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM. School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UWM

    You may participate in this field school free as a community intern. However if you want university credits you will need to sign up for summer school classes at http://www4.uwm.edu/schedule/

    We will be accepting a maximum of 15 students.  You may take a maximum of 6 credits.  Choose from the list below. 


    ARCH 190 Special Topics: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School.  –3 cr.

    ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr.

    ARCH 550: Building Types & Settings (Seminar)

    ARCH 551: American Vernacular Arch 

    ARCH 553: Vernacular Buildings/Groupings 

    ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr.

    ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr.

    ARCH 391/791 Independent Studies for Undergraduate/Graduate Students (Directed Research). –3 cr.

    This summer course provides students an immersion experience in the field recording of the built environment and cultural landscapes and an opportunity to learn how to write history literally “from the ground up.”  The 2017 field school focuses on Sherman Park, a racially, economically and culturally diverse neighborhood known for its artist communities and active neighborhood groups. This summer we will study residential building types in this neighborhood—everyday residences, duplex and four squares, single- and multi-family units, boarded up homes, refabricated and reused homes, homes transformed into stores and workplaces, homes as works of art, homes remembered in family histories and homes in domestic worlds.

    This project seeks to employ the enduring creativity of storytelling, the power of digital humanities, and depth of local knowledge to galvanize Milwaukee residents to talk about their homes as repositories of community memory, spaces of caring and markers of civic pride. Students will learn how to “read” buildings within their urban material, social, ecological and cultural contexts, create reports on historic buildings and cultural landscapes and produce multimedia documentaries.

    The five-week course calendar covers a broad array of academic skills. Workshops during Week 1 will focus on photography, measured drawings, documentation and technical drawings; no prior experience is necessary. Week 2 will include archival and historical research focusing on the study of the built environment. Week 3 schedule includes workshops on oral history interviewing and digital ethnography. Week 4 is centered on mapping and archival research. Week 5 and 6 will be devoted to producing final reports and multi-media documentaries.

    Nationally recognized faculty directing portions of this school include Jeffrey E. Klee, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael H. Frisch, Professor and Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., and Arijit Sen, Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

    Documentary equipment, and supplies, will be provided, but students must be able to fund their own travel, meals and modest lodging accommodations (if they are from out of town). For more information please contact Prof. Arijit Sen at senA@uwm.edu.

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